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Illinois Nursing Home Report Finds Major Infractions in Two Homes

Illinois Nursing Home Report Finds Major Infractions in Two Homes

The Illinois nursing home report has produced $50,000 in fines against two nursing homes.

The Peoria Journal Star reported that two nursing homes from Peoria, Illinois, have been fined following a report that found them in violation of the Illinois Nursing Home Care Act. The Illinois nursing home report fines amounted to $50,000 total, $25,000 each.

According to the Illinois Nursing Home Act, the Generations at Peoria and Sharon Health Care Pines nursing homes each received the fines from the Illinois Department of Public Health. Both fines were classified as “Type A,” referring to violations of a nursing home that created an environment where there is a high likelihood of serious mental or physical harm or death. This classification also contains any violations where an injury or death has already occurred.

Generations at Peoria administrator, Becky Hubbard, has contested the claims of the Illinois nursing home report. The 144-bed skilled care facility has been cited for “failure to ensure a resident was free from abuse and sexual assault.”

According to the Illinois nursing home report, on Aug. 17, 2019, an unnamed, female resident claimed that they were sleeping and awoke to a man engaging in sexual intercourse with her. Generations staff members and a medical exam confirmed that the resident was sexually assaulted. Local police were notified but at the time of the Illinois nursing home report publication, no arrest has occurred yet.

The second nursing home named in the Illinois nursing home report, Sharon Health Care Pines, has been cited for “failure to verify a resident’s advance directive and not performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.” According to the Illinois nursing home report, the 116-bed intermediate care facility failed to correctly identify the patient’s advance directive.

On June 6, 2019, a female nursing home resident was found unresponsive in her bathroom. Shortly after, paramedics arrived and were initially informed that the resident had a standing do not resuscitate order (DNR). This statement, however, was a lie and the resident was in fact meant to be resuscitated. The failure of staff to ascertain whether CPR may be performed on the resident resulted in the resident’s death.

For more information about avoiding and recognizing physical abuse and its dangers, visit the National Association of Nursing Home Attorneys’ Physical Abuse Page.